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Pie Crust 101
Pie Crust 101 <p>Pie fillings come in many shapes, sizes and flavors, from sweet to savory. But in every presentation, crust is key. Whether you're making a 1-crust or 2-crust pie, it starts with making the best dough for the job. <a href="/videos/profiles/about-susan-reid">Susan Reid</a> shows you how from her test kitchen at King Arthur Flour. <span id="block">Check out the</span><em><strong><span id="block"> <a style="&quot;border:none" href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0881502472?ie=UTF8&amp;tag=httpwwwhow2he-20&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=0881502472&quot;&gt;&lt;img border=&quot;0&quot; src=">King Arthur Flour 200th Anniversary Cookbook</a> <span style="font-style: normal;"><span style="font-weight: normal;">for more inspired ideas.</span></span></span></strong></em></p>

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crust, pie, pie crust, pie dough

Pie fillings come in many shapes, sizes and flavors, from sweet to savory. But in every presentation, crust is key. Whether you're making a 1-crust or 2-crust pie, it starts with making the best dough for the job. Susan Reid shows you how from her test kitchen at King Arthur Flour. Check out the King Arthur Flour 200th Anniversary Cookbook for more inspired ideas.

Comments (14)

  • Posted Wednesday, January 9, 2013, at 3:06 pm by King Arthur Flour:
    To blind bake the crust: use weights to press down the bottom crust and prevent air bubbles. Bake 375' for 20 minutes, remove the weights, then bake 15 minutes longer or until golden brown. As always, check your oven and bake time to get a golden brown pie crust. Irene @ KAF
  • Posted Saturday, December 1, 2012, at 7:11 am by Don:
    I have been making pies for years and find it not necessary to weigh the ingredients because the fat flour ratio can vary with little or no effect on the crust. it's the water that is so important and no scale will help you there. Having said that, the scale is the baker's best friend.
  • Posted Sunday, November 18, 2012, at 8:28 am by jreynolds:
    I usually do custard or chiffon pies and, therefore, prebake the pie shell. How would you recommend doing that with this recipe? Thanks
  • Posted Monday, November 21, 2011, at 11:56 am by King Arthur Flour:
    Use a spray bottle you can find at your local hardware store or dollar store! It will be useful for pie making or bread baking. Happy Baking! Irene @ KAF
  • Posted Monday, November 14, 2011, at 9:22 pm by Trish:
    Where do I find the spray bottle Susan used in this video?
  • Posted Sunday, October 16, 2011, at 3:02 pm by King Arthur Flour:
    So glad you found this pie tutorial useful. Now you're truly all set for holiday baking! Irene @ KAF
  • Posted Thursday, October 13, 2011, at 6:36 pm by Sue:
    I love this video! Susan is a great teacher, and I love all the tips. Thanks so much, I can't wait to try this recipe.
  • Posted Sunday, November 28, 2010, at 5:50 am by prochef:
    One more thing...the laminating is a great idea! Hey, if it works for croissants, why not pie dough too! :)
  • Posted Sunday, November 28, 2010, at 5:14 am by prochef:
    LOVE the video! Just kills me that as a fellow professionally trained chef, that you didn't weigh the flour! But I know why you did it that way. Btw, a cup of AP flour is 4.25 oz (you didn't specify AP flour...different flours have different weights). But don't let my attention to detail bring you down. EVERYONE, this is EXACTLY how it is taught in culinary school. Right on the money! Also, LOVED the tip about using the spritzer! Gonna use that now! Thanks so much for the AWESOME video!!! :) Happy Cooking!
  • Posted Wednesday, September 22, 2010, at 6:27 pm by luv2cook:
    Excellent video, but lets talk about the better method of measuring ingredients. Weighing them! I have now for years moved from cups to weighing as it is more accurate and gives highly repeatable results. I recommend to anyone who is cooking to use it when ever it is possible.I do know it is not always possible, I too have some older recipes and I have not converted them. I also have old German recipes that must be weighed as that is how they did it. :-) KEEP ON BAKIN'
  • Posted Monday, September 20, 2010, at 1:35 pm by King Arthur Flour:
    I'm glad you liked the video. I like to crimp the crust between my thumb and index finger doing a little twist of wrist to the right and just working my way around the pie. I hope this helps.Try it. Have fun! Mary@ KAF
  • Posted Saturday, August 28, 2010, at 1:07 am by Janet:
    Seeing the dough at the various stages was such a help. Really good video...having watched it makes it seem easy as pie! Only one thing...I do wish I could have seen exactly how people do that wavy crimp on the edge. Perhaps if she used a plain pie dish, she could have demonstrated that, but the fact that the dish she used itself had a crimped edge, the dough kept wanting to fall into the plate's own crimping pattern, and she didn't quite get to show it very well at all. Also I wanted to say, I tested out the weight of 2 cups of flour the way I usually dig my dry measure into the flour without fluffing the flour, as she said you should, and indeed, I had more flour than I should have had by weight for the 2 cups. No wonder my pie crust was too dry and crumbly when I started to roll out even though I used all the water recommended.
  • Posted Monday, March 22, 2010, at 3:43 pm by King Arthur Flour:
    Glad you enjoyed this video. I hope you have conquered many a pie since then! EFB @ KAF
  • Posted Saturday, November 14, 2009, at 10:52 pm by Susan Zubatkin:
    whew this was a great video for "Pie Anxiety" people like me--thank you!

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